Jessica H. Clark


Associate Professor of Classics

Research and Teaching Specializations

  • CV Curriculum Vitae
  • Roman Republic; Roman history; Latin literature of the Republic and early Empire; Roman military history; paleography

Background

Jessica H. Clark (PhD Princeton, 2008) is an Associate Professor in the Department of Classics, specializing in the Roman Republic, and has taught at Florida State since 2013. She was previously an assistant professor of History at California State University, Chico (2008-2013), where she taught Greek, Roman, and world history. Her first book, Triumph in Defeat: Military Loss and the Roman Republic (Oxford, 2014), examined the ways in which Roman political actors responded to battlefield loss in the Second Punic War and the following century. She continued this research project as co-editor of Brill’s Companion to Military Defeat in Ancient Mediterranean Society (2018).

Her research currently focuses on war and military service, as represented in Latin literature of the second and first centuries BCE, both prose and verse. She is also interested in issues of textual transmission, particularly of fragmentary texts, and women and gender in the Roman Republic.

Education:

PhD Princeton University (Classics & the Program in the Ancient World), 2008
MA Princeton University (Classics), 2006
BA Wesleyan University (Classics & Archaeology), 2002

 

Publications and Lectures

Triumph in Defeat: Military Loss and the Roman Republic. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.
 

Brill’s Companion to Military Defeat in Ancient Mediterranean Society. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2018, co-edited with Brian Turner (Portland State University).
 

Adfirmare and Appeals to Authority in Servius Danielis.” Forthcoming, Harvard Studies in Classical Philology vol. 111 (2020).

 

“The Annals as Historical Evidence in Ancient and Modern Commentaries.” Forthcoming in Ennius, Poetry, and History, ed. Cynthia Damon and Joseph Farrell (2020). Cambridge.
 

“Winning too well: Pompey’s Victories as Urban Disaster at Rome.” Forthcoming in Urban Disasters and the Roman Imagination, ed. Virginia Closs and Elizabeth Keitel. Trends in Classics: Journal of Classical Studies. De Gruyter.
 

“Anecdotal History and the Social War.” Forthcoming in Romans at War: Citizens and Society in the Roman Republic, ed. Michael Fronda and Jeremy Armstrong (2019). Routledge.
 

“Defeated, Not? The Afterlife of Scholia on Aen. 11.305-307.” Vergilius 63 (2017), 3–16.
 

“Were Military Tribunes First Elected in 362 or 311 BCE?” Historia 65.3 (2016), 275–97.
 

Nequiquam tantum belli: News and Politics in Livy, Book 35.1-8.” Histos 8 (2014), 189–20.
 

“Roman Optimism before Cannae: The Vow of the Ver Sacrum (Livy 22.10).” Mnemosyne 67 (2014), 405-22.


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